Charles Lindbergh: Crossing Bounderies

Part 1 in the series Inspirational People

With this series I wish to remember all the people whose life stories bear testament to the fact that dedication is the primary ingredient to making great contributions in life.

While we all dream big and aspire to achieve big things we should remember that it is through small achievements that we acquire the discipline to execute bigger ideas.

We learn this from Charles Lindbergh.  The first man to fly non-stop from New York to Paris, crossing the pacific ocean and and winning the Orteig Prize, this after 6 men had lost their lives attempting the same.  At age 25 on 20th of May 1927 Mr Lindbergh together with his partner, a single seat, single engine monoplane took off pursuing a journey that was more suicidal than anything else.

From an early age, Charles had exhibited an interest in the mechanics of motorized transportation including his family’s Saxon Six auto-mobile, later his Excelsior motorbike. By the time he enrolled as a mechanical engineering student at the University of Wisconsin–Madisonin 1920, he had also become fascinated with flying even though he “had never been close enough to a plane to touch it.” Lindbergh dropped out of the engineering program in February 1922, and a month later headed to Lincoln, Nebraska, to enroll as a student at the flying school” wikipedia

What is it that must go through a young man’s head so much that in five years after learning to fly he attempts to fly where no man had ever flown?  My view is that it boils down curiosity and the drive to fulfill it.  After succeeding in this daring attempt he became a world icon in aviation, receiving the highest honor in the US military and inspiring the aviation industry to grow by 3000% only 3 years after his achievement!

Whenever I think of a project or a client that I know I need to work with, but feel as though they are too big or out of my league, I think of Charles Lindbergh and his mammoth achievement with virtually no experience.  I also think about the powerful words etched in  Mark 9:23, “If thou cans’t believe, all things are possible…”

Today I’m inspired by Charles Lindbergh.